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Sleep and the menopause are interconnected, as changes in hormone levels during menopause can affect sleep quality and duration, leading to various sleep-related issues such as insomnia and night sweats.

When you wake up in the morning, your brain is in a state of transition. It is slowly moving from the deep sleep state of delta waves to the waking state of beta waves. During this time, your brain is particularly susceptible to the effects of external stimuli.

This is why it is important to be mindful of what you expose your brain to first thing in the morning. If you check your phone first thing, you are bombarding your brain with information and stimuli before it has had a chance to fully wake up. Lack of proper sleep and menopause can lead to a number of problems, including:

  • Decreased focus and attention: Your brain is still in a state of transition when you wake up, so it is not yet able to focus and pay attention as well as it can later in the day. Checking your phone first thing in the morning can further impair your focus and attention by distracting you with notifications, emails, and other content.
  • Increased stress and anxiety: The constant stream of information and stimuli from your phone can be overwhelming and stressful, especially first thing in the morning. This can increase your stress and anxiety levels, which can make it difficult to relax and focus.
  • Reduced creativity: Theta waves, which are associated with creativity, are dominant during light sleep. When you check your phone first thing in the morning, you are disrupting your theta wave activity, which can reduce your creativity.
  • Impaired memory and learning: Delta waves, which are associated with memory consolidation, are dominant during deep sleep. When you check your phone first thing in the morning, you are disrupting your delta wave activity, which can impair your memory and learning.

In addition to these cognitive sleep and menopause problems, checking your phone first thing in the morning can also lead to physical problems, such as:

  • Disrupted sleep: The blue light emitted from phone screens can suppress the production of melatonin, a hormone that helps to regulate sleep-wake cycles. This can make it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep at night.
  • Eye strain: Looking at a small screen for an extended period of time can cause eye strain, which can lead to headaches, blurred vision, and other problems.
  • Neck pain: Slouching over your phone can put strain on your neck and shoulders, leading to pain and discomfort.

How to avoid the negative effects of checking your phone first thing in the morning

There are a few simple things you can do to avoid the negative effects of checking your phone first thing in the morning:

  • Keep your phone out of your bedroom at night. This will help you to resist the temptation to check your phone first thing in the morning.
  • Set a timer for 30 minutes after you wake up before checking your phone. This will give your brain time to wake up and transition to the waking state before you expose it to the stimuli from your phone.
  • Use a sunrise alarm clock to wake up gradually. This will help to ease your brain into the waking state.
  • Start your day with a healthy breakfast and some exercise. This will help to energize your body and mind, and improve your focus and attention.
  • Spend time with loved ones in the morning. This will help you to feel connected and supported, and reduce your stress levels.

Sleep and the menopause are interconnected, so establishing a bedtime routine that promotes restful sleep can further enhance brain health and overall well-being. Visit Pause and Co Healthcare for expert guidance and tips to manage your menopause symptoms effectively.

By following these tips, you can start your day off on the right foot and protect your brain from the negative effects of phone use.

 

Nadira Awal

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